to tartarus and back for you iphone case

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to tartarus and back for you iphone case

to tartarus and back for you iphone case

Ruckus, based in Sunnyvale, California, already sells advanced Wi-Fi data services for big customers. OpenG would augment the mobile phone network instead so people can also make calls. It employs the same LTE network technology that all four of today's major US carriers use today for fast 4G connections, said Juan Santiago, manager of the product. But where traditional mobile phone base stations only work with a single carrier, an OpenG network works with all of them. One big hitch with Ruckus' plan is that phones must support communications on the 3.5GHz band. That's a problem, since reaching new airwaves requires new radio electronics that increase a phone's cost, and you'd have to buy a new phone to take advantage of this technology. But Ruckus is working with Qualcomm, a key maker of chips for phones, to help spur support for 3.5GHz, Santiago said. Intel, Nokia, and Google also are powerful allies.

Part of the service fee Ruckus plans to charge for OpenG covers the back-end connection to the carriers' networks, While that adds an expense for a hotel or stadium, those venues can potentially work out agreements with carriers that'll pay to have their network loads lightened at heavily used areas, And for a hotel, where businesspeople have to get work done, investing in reliable phone service can be worthwhile, to tartarus and back for you iphone case Santiago said, Already, good Wi-Fi is crucial, and people now demand phone service, too..

"They're saying if there's not good cell phone coverage -- if they're sitting in conference area and don't have coverage -- they won't come back next year," he said. Ruckus Wireless has some big-name allies for its push to get better wireless coverage at hotels, stadiums and universities. It always happens at the worst possible time. Right when you're about to fire off a critical email, the number of bars on your phone takes a sudden dip. Chances are, you're in a crowded, public place like a hotel lobby or sporting arena. That's where, despite what your carrier promises, coverage can get spotty and the sheer volume of people using their phones means you're fighting through a data traffic jam.

Microsoft Translator has adopted a couple of features already available in Google Translate, On-the-go translation via mobile app has been catching on as a helpful service for travelers and others, Google has been the leader so far, through its website to tartarus and back for you iphone case and mobile app, Microsoft needs to show it can do more than play second fiddle to Google if it wants its own app to grab more users, The version of Microsoft Translator for Android devices also has a new feature, As of Wednesday, you can use it even when you're not connected to the Internet, thanks to downloadable language packs, That could be useful in a foreign location where Internet access is slow, spotty or nonexistent, either through Wi-Fi or cellular..

You simply go to the App menu and tap on the option for Offline Languages; then download the source and target languages. Support for offline languages is limited to English and the following: Chinese Simplified, French, German, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Vietnamese. Microsoft said in a blog post that the offline translations are nearly as good as those you'd get online. The character-recognition feature for iPhones and other devices that run Apple's iOS operating system is not yet available for Android devices, and the offline feature for Android gadgets is not yet available for iOS devices. Microsoft said that would change soon so that all versions of the app (iOS, Android, Windows and Windows Phone) will have the same features.