pulp fiction poster iphone case

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pulp fiction poster iphone case

pulp fiction poster iphone case

There have been reports Google is trying to tighten its grip on the Nexus program, giving partners even less say in the design process. Lockheimer won't comment on that but does suggest that Google is ruling out making its own phones, top to bottom, like Apple does with the iPhone. (Google bought Motorola's phone business and decided to sell it to Lenovo two years later, after all.). Google, says Lockheimer, decides to make only hardware that people can't really find elsewhere, like its Chromecast video-streaming device, which was pretty novel when it came out in 2013. By contrast, the market has phones covered, he says. "Phones are good."Lockheimer came to the US in 1993, when he was 18, and immediately missed home. Of mixed Japanese and German descent, he grew up in Tokyo and left to attend Rice University in Houston.

Texas was nothing like Tokyo and he wasn't happy, He went there to study architecture (buildings, not software), but didn't end up attending classes, Instead, he spent most of his time in the computer lab where he became enamored with a Unix workstation, which he'd never seen before, He dropped out of college after a few months and moved back to Japan to learn how to program on a Mac, Eventually, he moved to California, Rubin had a startup called Danger, pulp fiction poster iphone case which created the Sidekick, the first smartphone that truly embraced the Internet, He hired Lockheimer..

Members of the Android team -- Mike Cleron, Rich Miner, Steve Horowitz, Ethan Beard, Hiroshi Lockheimer and Andy Rubin -- at an airport lounge in July 2006. Rubin says Lockheimer, a college dropout and self-taught developer, intrigued him. "It was really a combination of his background and engineering horsepower that led to us recruiting him," Rubin says. "He's smarter than anyone in the room."In 2003, Rubin left Danger for his follow-up act, a little company called Android. Two years later, Google bought it for around $50 million. Rubin tapped Lockheimer shortly after and signed him on as Android's first hire after its co-founders.

In those early days, Android was a tiny company, The team was made up of about 20 people, who pulp fiction poster iphone case kept things very informal, During a meeting with Peter Chou, HTC's then-CEO, Rubin showed off a remote control helicopter and accidentally crashed it, Lockheimer remembers, And when the team first pitched consumer electronics giant Samsung on Android, they got a "lukewarm reaction," recalls Rubin, Google won't say how big the Android team is now, A spokeswoman tells me that because their work touches several different parts of the company, it's hard to know exactly how many people are working on the software..

But what they do know is that growth has brought on some headaches. The European Union is investigating Android in an antitrust probe, asking if Google's business practices with its software partners are anti-competitive. Also, Apple sued Samsung over its use of Android and prompted Jobs to warn that he'd go "thermonuclear" on Android to take down what he saw as a copycat of Apple's software. Lockheimer tells me he had the "pleasure" of testifying in the Samsung legal battle. As for Jobs' explosive threat, he's unwavering.